sansaspark:

During the scene when Mulan decides to go to war instead of her father, she decides to do it while sitting on the foot of the Great Stone Dragon. The image of the dragon looking over Mulan is repeated several times throughout the sequence, and the bolts of lightning strike at significant times whenever the dragon is in sight. When Mulan takes her father’s scroll and when she is praying to her ancestors, the Great Stone Dragon can be seen. It is also engraved on the sword Mulan uses to cut her hair and the handles of the wardrobe containing the armor are in the shape of the dragon’s head. The dragon’s eyes glowing in the temple symbolizes Mulan’s role as protector of her family awakening, instead of the actual dragon.

The reason Mushu couldn’t wake the dragon is because the dragon was no longer there. Mulan is implied to be the Great Dragon that protects her family.

(via hows-your-custard)

digg:

BREAKING: DISNEYLAND NO LONGER HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH

THE POOL IS SHAPED LIKE A BONE, I AM LOSING MY MIND OVER THESE DOGS

(via hungry-feminist)

Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

(via redrushman)

cantwaitforpizza:

i can’t stop laughing he’s like what no climb

Here’s the funny thing that people might not know about chameleons - they’re super weird and difficult to raise sometimes. Not all of them are like this, but most chameleons just won’t drink standing water. They only like RUNNING water, so when you’re keeping them in an enclosure, you’ve either got to have a dripping system or a little waterfall or else they won’t drink. I have no idea why they’re like this, they’re just weird.

So basically this is the chameleon going “YESSS, GIVE ME THE MOVING WATER, I CRAVE IT.”

(via hows-your-custard)

deadpanaesthetic:

MyeongBeom Kim,Untitled, 2008. deer taxidermy, leaves, tree branches, 550x550x400cm

I saw this picture once a couple of years ago and wrote something inspired by it and Bambi.
Gotta find that again someday.

deadpanaesthetic:

MyeongBeom Kim,
Untitled, 2008. 
deer taxidermy, leaves, tree branches, 550x550x400cm

I saw this picture once a couple of years ago and wrote something inspired by it and Bambi.

Gotta find that again someday.

(via leftboob-enthusiast)

Legitimately taught Echo how to play fetch this evening. Tossed a ball, and she would run after it, attack it, then carry it back. She even dropped it right in front of me a few times! Very precious.

Seven Things The Movies Forgot About Ron

lurknomoar:

Book Ron was an interesting, attractive and relatable character, and I feel that the movies really unfairly relegated him to the position of comic relief. The dynamics of the trio had to be simplified into hero + heroine + mascot, and that robbed us of a truly fascinating character. So here are a few things you should remember:

1. He really is poor and it matters. HP may have huge issues when it comes to representations of race and sexuality, but deserves a round of applause for having a character come from a low-income background, with the fact of their poverty not glossed over but made into a plot point. JKR is really consistent about this – about the things Ron eats and wears and buys and doesn’t buy, the way he reacts when Harry unwittingly flaunts his own wealth. Poorer kids who have to go without brand name clothes will see themselves in Ron, and richer kids will learn that poverty isn’t something you deserve. Kids who empathize with Ron because he can’t afford to replace a broken wand are less likely to grow up to be assholes who complain about the extravagant lifestyle of people on welfare.

2. He has knowledge about the world. Out of the trio, he is the only real insider in wizarding society. Hermione is the one who knows magical theory and basically everything that can be found in a library. But when it comes to wizarding society and all of its habits, rules and unspoken assumptions, he is the one who can fill the other two in. Throughout the course of the septology, he does almost as much exposition as Hermione.

3. He is actually quite intelligent. Despite what the movies would have you believe, he is not dumb. He is mediocre in most of his schoolwork, and lacks Hermione’s booksmarts, but he is an excellent chess player, meaning he possesses good strategic abilities. He is the one who keeps a calm head while throttled by Devil’s Snare, and he talks Hermione through saving both their lives. He has decent observational skills, after all he was to one to spot inconsistencies in Hermione’s third-year time table. Seeing his common sense and social insight as less valuable than Hermione’s academic knowledge betrays an inherently flawed definition of intelligence. (Especially since academic knowledge tends to be gendered as male, and social knowledge as female, think of Poirot and Miss Marple.)

4. He is loyal. He is the embodiment of loyalty. The movies erase some of the most poignant moments proving this, and hand some of them over to Hermione. But it is Ron who stands in front of Harry, daring Sirius Black to kill them both, despite his broken leg. It is Ron who repeatedly defies Malfoy and even Snape to protect Hermione from verbal abuse. When his mother believes tabloid lies about Hermione, he takes Hermione’s side. When his brother tells him to stop being friends with Harry because of the political risk, he is so furious at the suggestion that he tears up the letter. He is unthinkingly loyal to his friends, this is why it is such a big deal that he leaves in the seventh book – because it contradicts who he really is.

5. He is genuinely funny. In the movies we are more likely to laugh at Ron than laugh with him, and the jokes he makes tend to be somewhat juvenile. But in the books his sense of humour evolves with him and with the reader, leading to this dry, snarky, irreverent tone that is genuinely very enjoyable. Ron is fun to read, and he sounds like someone who would be lots of fun to be around. He jokes a lot, but it is rarely spiteful, and often meant to comfort or distract someone – a proof of emotional intelligence.

6. He is kind. I don’t really how to put this, other than the fact that if Ron was a girl, he would be immediately defined as a caretaker. He stays in Hogwarts over Christmas so that Harry doesn’t have to be alone. He often acts oblivious and selfish on the surface, but ultimately he really obviously pays attention to the wellbeing of his friends. From his words and actions and body-language we can piece together the sort of person who can make life suck less just by showing up, who is always there for his friends even if he cannot do anything specific to help.

7. He has a huge inferiority complex. The movies hardly touch on it but in the books it is his main character arc. He feels inferior to his brothers’ achievements, to Harry’s chosen status, to Hermione’s intelligence. It is explicitly stated in book four that he doesn’t understand how can someone not want to be chosen. The books are far more clear in implying that he gets together with Lavander because he’s insecure about romance. The Horcrux doesn’t get to him through his love for Hermione like it does in the movie, it gets to him through the nagging suspicion that he has never been good enough for anything or anyone ever, including Hermione. And the movie laughed off the scene after the destruction of the Horcrux, when Harry finally gets how much Ron suffered of this fear of being second best and Ron gets that Harry never chose to be chosen. But fear of being inadequate is the primary driving force of Ron throughout the septology, and the movie fails to see value in Ron just as Ron fails to see value in himself: his caring, his loyalty, his wealth of non-academic knowledge and his awesome sense of humour are not tangible achievements, and they are not something somebody notices about themselves.

 Movie Ron is the person book Ron is afraid of being in his lowest moments, an incompetent oaf who makes rude jokes and chews with his mouth open, somebody their friends only keep around out of pity and habit, somebody Hermione would have to settle for out of a lack of better options. But book Ron, for all his flaws, is a loyal, funny and warm person with many valuable practical skills.  Also: I can imagine Hermione regularly thanking her lucky stars for ending up with someone as amazing as him.

(via queerjourno)

heliosdayspring:

me: *looks at ocs i made 4 years ago*

me: we can rebuild them. we have the technology

(via leftboob-enthusiast)

Woo, that’s a bunch. LET’S GET STARTED.
Harry Potter: I’ve got a scar on my shin from years ago when I unwittingly walked down the aisle of a Hobby Lobby and ran into a small decorative wheelbarrow, tripping and doing a full somersault before landing on my ass. That wheelbarrow dug into my shin and made a nice little scar.
Voldemort: I’d probably make a Horcrux out of something very inconspicuous but resilient, like a steel pipe, so that I could incorporate it into my life without drawing attention to it (say, using it in the plumbing of my house), and it would be very unlikely to become damaged.
Hedwig: If I were at Hogwarts, obviously I’d bring an owl as my pet. They’re practical, beautiful, and take care of themselves for the most part.
Rubeus Hagrid: My favorite mystical creature is a….? Ugh, I’m bad at choosing favorites. There are so many CRAZY, great magical animals. Bowtruckles, flobberworms, phoenixes are all great in their own way. Unicorns! Kelpies! There’s no way to make a decision.
Minerva McGonagall: THIS IS SO HARD. Like, my favorite spell? Ugh. I love transfiguration magic, so it would probably be something in that vein, but I can’t think of a single spell I’d hold above the others. Except maybe that one hex that makes you dance uncontrollably - that one’s hysterical. Or, ooh, the one that tickles you, Rictusempra! Silly dueling charms are my favorite, apparently.
Remus Lupin: Maybe a cockatoo? But maybe a tiger?
Professor Sprout: Transfiguration is probably my “favorite,” but Potions is maybe one of the coolest classes Hogwarts has.
Mr. Ollivander: According to Pottermore, I’d have an approximately 10.5 inch dogwood wand with a phoenix core, surprisingly swishy. In my mind, I imagine it being pretty light in color, with a loose crossing spirals carved around the thin and polished body, but the handle is a bit thicker and has kept the rough outer layer of bark to make gripping the wand easier.
Cho Chang: While it’s unlikely that I’m sporty enough for Quidditch, I think I’d probably be a Keeper. I’m not accurate enough to be a Chaser, and my eyesight and speed aren’t good enough to make me a Seeker. Possibly I could play as a Beater, but I don’t know if I can hit the bludger hard enough.
Aunt Petunia: My favorite flowers are gardenias and plumerias.
Want to ask me about stuff? Here’s that list.

Woo, that’s a bunch. LET’S GET STARTED.

Harry Potter: I’ve got a scar on my shin from years ago when I unwittingly walked down the aisle of a Hobby Lobby and ran into a small decorative wheelbarrow, tripping and doing a full somersault before landing on my ass. That wheelbarrow dug into my shin and made a nice little scar.

Voldemort: I’d probably make a Horcrux out of something very inconspicuous but resilient, like a steel pipe, so that I could incorporate it into my life without drawing attention to it (say, using it in the plumbing of my house), and it would be very unlikely to become damaged.

Hedwig: If I were at Hogwarts, obviously I’d bring an owl as my pet. They’re practical, beautiful, and take care of themselves for the most part.

Rubeus Hagrid: My favorite mystical creature is a….? Ugh, I’m bad at choosing favorites. There are so many CRAZY, great magical animals. Bowtruckles, flobberworms, phoenixes are all great in their own way. Unicorns! Kelpies! There’s no way to make a decision.

Minerva McGonagall: THIS IS SO HARD. Like, my favorite spell? Ugh. I love transfiguration magic, so it would probably be something in that vein, but I can’t think of a single spell I’d hold above the others. Except maybe that one hex that makes you dance uncontrollably - that one’s hysterical. Or, ooh, the one that tickles you, Rictusempra! Silly dueling charms are my favorite, apparently.

Remus Lupin: Maybe a cockatoo? But maybe a tiger?

Professor Sprout: Transfiguration is probably my “favorite,” but Potions is maybe one of the coolest classes Hogwarts has.

Mr. Ollivander: According to Pottermore, I’d have an approximately 10.5 inch dogwood wand with a phoenix core, surprisingly swishy. In my mind, I imagine it being pretty light in color, with a loose crossing spirals carved around the thin and polished body, but the handle is a bit thicker and has kept the rough outer layer of bark to make gripping the wand easier.

Cho Chang: While it’s unlikely that I’m sporty enough for Quidditch, I think I’d probably be a Keeper. I’m not accurate enough to be a Chaser, and my eyesight and speed aren’t good enough to make me a Seeker. Possibly I could play as a Beater, but I don’t know if I can hit the bludger hard enough.

Aunt Petunia: My favorite flowers are gardenias and plumerias.

Want to ask me about stuff? Here’s that list.